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At precisely this time each year, I become consumed with any and all things garden. It starts with the pull of Down the Garden Path by Beverley Nichols from the bookshelf and onto my nightstand. For the past few spring seasons, I have read this book in its entirety in bits and pieces before bed in the evenings. And each year, the words seem to re-introduce themselves to me as if we’d never met and everything is new again. (Surely those are the best books?) Mostly pertaining to floral and formal planting, there are chapters detailing the flamboyant author’s very colourful conundrums with both his kitchen garden and orchards as well.

Down the Garden Path is wildly entertaining, but mostly it gets me thinking about what I intend to plant in our very own vegetable and flower beds for the year. It also creates a bit of an obsession in planning for time when I can get out and make a clean sweep to prepare for new growth. (By obsession, I mean waking up in the middle of the night worrying about how far the horseradish root has invaded into artichoke territory over the winter months, and how very sad, but very likely it is, that one of the Wisteria isn’t going to make it this year.)

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So it begins. With a pencil behind my ear, I peruse seed catalogues, gardening books, GIY Ireland meeting times and fancy landscape magazines. I chat with friends and neighbours, and begin scribbling and planning.

Essentially I decide that I am just looking for a few new offerings in the veg and fruit department, and perhaps a new tree or two. Luckily, I was gifted a peony plant from my generous neighbour, and I can see new growth already so blossoms will be something to really look forward to in July

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Right now there is an abundance of rhubarb and rosemary with pretty lavender flowers around the farm. I’ll make some rhubarb jam and slather it on a duck egg sponge, but first l shall dig into unknown territory with a syllabub featuring two ingredients that I can’t help but imagine will love each others company.

Syllabub is a classic dessert on this side of the Atlantic where people have been enjoying it centuries. It is essentially a dish made of milk or cream with the addition of wine, cider, or other spirit, and often enhanced with a natural flavor. In this case, I have decided to cut the cream with Poitín (formerly known as Irish moonshine) and sweeten it with a simple syrup made from rhubarb and rosemary.

For me, syllabub  simply spells spring garden party in BIG BLAZING LETTERS. And, while we’re not quite there yet, I am already dreaming of such a sunny afternoon dalliance. Admittedly, this is especially easy to visualize while spooning sweet, boozy, creamy bites of said fluffy syllabub into my eager mouth.

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Geoffrey already has his pumpkin and Purple of Sicily cauliflower seedlings started; his bumblebee garden packet at the ready for sprinkling. He gets a bed or two to himself; last year he grew upwards of 30 Romanesco courgettes, the long stripey ones. He was quite proud of himself, but he missed the pumpkins that he had planted the year before with great success so we are back onto those again.

I have seed envelopes from Ireland: Brown Envelope seeds from Madeline McKeever in West Cork, and from America: Baker Seed Company, an organic and mostly heirloom seed company out of Missouri.

I begin the whole seedy selection process. Colorado Red Quinoa and Collard Greens from Georgia go in the “TBP” (to be planted) pile while White Scallop Squash in  “NY” (next year). As usual, the amount of seeds I’ve ordered is dizzying and I make a note to cut back in future.

I look at the time a few hours later and then glance around the table. The syllabub is whipped, biscuits are dipped, tea is sipped, and the seeds are finally picked.

It’s spring, after all.

Rhubarb & Rosemary Spring Syllabub with Poitín
Ingredients
300g whipping cream
50g rhubarb & rosemary simple syrup
25ml Irish Poitín (or white wine, hard cider, champagne, sherry)
A stack of Ginger Nut biscuits, to serve
Rosemary stems to garnish
Method
For the simple syrup
1. Cut one large stalk of rhubarb into small pieces
2. Place in saucepan with two stems of fresh rosemary and 80g caster sugar.
3. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Lower heat and let simmer until all sugar is dissolved.
4. Take off heat and let cool at room temperature. Strain into container and refrigerate.
For the Syllabub
1. Whip the cream and syrup together until soft peaks form. Stir in the Poitín.
2. Spoon into glasses or bowls, garnish with rosemary.
3. Serve with Ginger Nut biscuits or rhubarb compote.
 

Slan Abhaile,

Imen

Photos and styling by Imen McDonnell 2014.  

 

 

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10 Responses to “Rhubarb & Rosemary Syllabub with Poitín”

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  2. […] weekend I’d love to make and share this rhubarb and rosemary syllabub from Farmette, this mango, chili rice salad from Happy Yolks, this pull-apart baklava bread from […]

  3. Kathryn says:

    Oh, this is such a beautiful post. There’s such a wonderful dreamy quality to the light in these pictures; perfectly matched by the spring-like flavours.

  4. Hi Imen! So glad to have found your lovely blog. I’ve been following you on IG for a while but unfortunately I never came across your blog. Until today. I am just the same come April. Yesterday I was out sowing in our veg beds and every year I realize I’ve bought far too many seeds… There’s simply not room for all the varieties I’d like to try 😉

    The appearance of the first rhubarb is pure joy and as tradition has it – we always make a rhubarb crumble when the first stalks are ready. We have to wait a week or two though…

    I have never heard of Syllabub but it looks and sounds amazing!

    Sonja

  5. Krista says:

    How fun to be dreaming up your Spring garden. 🙂 I’m working on my winter one – collecting kale and chicory and brussels sprouts seeds. 🙂 This syllabub sounds wonderful. It makes me think of Brambley Hedge books. 🙂

  6. Haven’t tried Rhubarb recipe at home, this recipes looks delicious on my list
    Beautiful photography Imen. Thank you xx

  7. Beth says:

    First of all….the photographs are looking amazing! Second of all, I love this recipe for multiple reasons, not the least of which is the fact that whatever “syllabub” and “poitin” were initially eluded me. Strange! New! And upon figuring out what this mystical “syllabub” is…. wow. This needs to happen very soon. Maybe with that jar of honeysuckle syrup I froze from last spring…before it’s pointless because it’s blooming all over again! xo

  8. ann says:

    OMG! My growing Rhubarb now has a delectable destiny…

  9. Donna Baker says:

    Can’t believe how wonderful that must taste.

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